Limited to 736 pieces / 173 left in stock

TTT Knievel Pre-order for 25% off

In-stock price:2,295.00 USD You save:600.00 USD Preorder price:1,695.00 USD
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Made from Evel Knievel’s final stuntbike, the 1977 “Shark Jump” Harley-Davidson XR750.

  • This is a Pre-Order item with expected delivery from FEBRUARY-2024. Read More
  • Free worldwide shipping. Customs/duties for non-EU orders not included. Read More
  • 36-month sales warranty & 30-day returns from date of delivery. Read More
  • Secure payments with credit card, Paypal or in monthly installments with Splitit
  • Need further help with this item? Contact us
In-stock price:2,295.00 USD You save:600.00 USD Preorder price:1,695.00 USD
Limited to 736 pieces / 173 left in stock
In-stock price:2,295.00 USD You save:600.00 USD Preorder price:1,695.00 USD
USD EUR GBP DKK

Made from Evel Knievel’s final stuntbike, the 1977 “Shark Jump” Harley-Davidson XR750.

  • This is a Pre-Order item with expected delivery from FEBRUARY-2024. Read More
  • Free worldwide shipping. Customs/duties for non-EU orders not included. Read More
  • 36-month sales warranty & 30-day returns from date of delivery. Read More
  • Secure payments with credit card, Paypal or in monthly installments with Splitit
  • Need further help with this item? Contact us
Limited to 736 pieces / 173 left in stock
In-stock price:2,295.00 USD You save:600.00 USD Preorder price:1,695.00 USD
USD EUR GBP DKK

Description

The TTT KNIEVEL is a limited edition timepiece made from Evel Knievels iconic last stuntbike, a Harley-Davidson XR750 known as the “Shark Jump” bike.

Robert Craig Knievel, known professionally as Evel Knievel, was an American motorcycle daredevil who captivated audiences with his death-defying stunts. Clad in his trademark star-spangled red, white, and blue jumpsuits, Knievel attempted more than 500 stunts in his decade-long career including 175 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps.

To this day the Evel Knievel name is unmistakable for his larger-than-life showmanship, flair and perhaps even a touch of madness – and he is credited with inspiring a whole generation of new bike riders.

Evel’s final performance was the 1977 Chicago Shark Jump, performed on a Harley-Davidson XR750. The bikes original handlebars and clutch levers have been reforged into the 736 limited-edition TTT Knievel timepieces.

Specifications
Dimensions
  • Diameter Case: 43,0 mm
  • Lug-to-lug: 46,5 mm
  • Height: 12,3 mm
  • Opening diameter: 33,0 mm
Movement
  • Customized SELLITA cal. SW200-1 Sb
  • Swiss Made
  • Time only (hours, minutes, seconds)
  • Automatic & manual winding
  • 26 Jewels
  • 41 Hours power reserver
  • 28,800 bph (4hz)
  • Accuracy ±6 seconds per day
Features
  • Star at 12-o’clock made from the handlebar levers of Evel Knievels “Shark Jump” XR750 bike
  • Fully skeletonized sandwich dial
  • 30-degree dial rotation between two positions “RIDE” and “DRESS via crown or bezel
  • Exhibition caseback
  • Serial number placque
  • 3-year full warranty from date of delivery
  • Water resistance 5 ATM, 50 meters
Materials
  • Crystal (Dial Glass): Sapphire crystal w. 3 layers of anti-reflection coating
  • Caseback glass: Mineral glass
  • Case & crown: 316L Stainless steel
  • Clasp: 316L Stainless steel
Strap
  • Width at lugs: 22,0mm
  • Width at clasp: 18,0mm
  • Length 125 / 75mm
  • Materials: Double calf-skin leather
Legal disclaimer
  • Developed and produced under License from K&K Promotions

“Anybody can jump a motorcycle. The trouble begins when you try to land it!” – Evel Knievel

King of the Daredevils

EVEL KNIEVEL

Robert Craig Knievel (1938 – 2007), known professionally as Evel Knievel, was an American motorcycle daredevil who captivated audiences with his death-defying stunts.

Clad in his trademark star-spangled red, white and blue jumpsuits, Knievel made more than 175 jumps during his decade long career.

Knievel was immortalized in the Smithsonian Institution as “America’s Legendary Daredevil”, and was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. He also holds the Guinness World Record for the most broken bones in a lifetime (35) having broken every major bone in his body except his neck.

Knievel got his first taste of international fame in 1967 as he jumped 15 cars in ABC’s TV-show “Wide World of Sports”. From here he got the idea to jump the fountains of Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. A still obscure Knievel managed to convince the hotel owner to allow him to attempt the outlandish stunt through a series of hoax phone calls posing as journalists looking to request more information about the jump.

Arguably his most famous stunt, the Caesars Palace jump was performed on New Years Eve 1967, and the crowd watched as he cleared the fountain but crashed during the landing. His injuries left him comatose for a month afterward, but when he regained consciousness, he was a global phenomenon. 

For the next decade, Evel Knievel would perform one death-defying stunt after another, included jumping over some 50 cars at the Los Angeles Coliseum (1973), a failed attempt to soar over the Snake River Canyon in Idaho using a rocket-powered motorcycle called the Sky-Cycle (1974), jumping over 13 buses at Wembley Stadium in London (1975), 14 buses at Kings Island, and leaping over a shark-filled tank in Chicago (1977).

  • Evel Knievel peering through shark teeth, as part of promoting the Chicago Shark Jump.
  • The handlebars of the XR750
  • Promotion poster for the CBS primetime show
  • The Shark Jump ramp and pool, showing the landing ramp that Knievel would ultimately crash on. The podium on the right is where the cameraman was positioned.
  • Evel Knievel in the hospital after his Shark Jump crash.
  • Evel Knievel peering through shark teeth, as part of promoting the Chicago Shark Jump.
  • The handlebars of the XR750
  • Promotion poster for the CBS primetime show
  • The Shark Jump ramp and pool, showing the landing ramp that Knievel would ultimately crash on. The podium on the right is where the cameraman was positioned.
  • Evel Knievel in the hospital after his Shark Jump crash.
  • Evel Knievel peering through shark teeth, as part of promoting the Chicago Shark Jump.
    Evel Knievel peering through shark teeth, as part of promoting the Chicago Shark Jump.
  • The handlebars of the XR750
    The handlebars of the XR750 “Shark Jump” bike were melted and reforged to form the star at 12-o’clock on the dial of all TTT KNIEVEL timepieces
  • Promotion poster for the CBS primetime show
    Promotion poster for the CBS primetime show “EVEL KNIEVEL’S DEATH DEFIERS” in which the Shark Jump would be the main event of the pilot episode.
  • The Shark Jump ramp and pool, showing the landing ramp that Knievel would ultimately crash on. The podium on the right is where the cameraman was positioned.
    The Shark Jump ramp and pool, showing the landing ramp that Knievel would ultimately crash on. The podium on the right is where the cameraman was positioned.
  • Evel Knievel in the hospital after his Shark Jump crash.
    Evel Knievel in the hospital after his Shark Jump crash.
Chicago Amphitheatre 1977

EVEL’S FINAL JUMP

The 38-year-old Knievel may have been on the latter end of his career, but he was still a major star when CBS approached him about a new live, primetime event to be called “Evel Knievel’s Death Defiers” in January 1977.

The Shark Jump, in which he would attempt to leap over “the world’s largest indoor saltwater pool, filled with man-eating killer sharks” (as the press release read) was to be the main event of the much-hyped pilot episode, and was to take place at the iconic Chicago International Amphitheatre.

Capitalizing on the 70’s shark paranoia set off by blockbuster movie ‘Jaws’ – the Shark Jump seemed like a good compromise after a decades-worth of high-risk stunts and broken bones. If promoted properly, it would keep audiences engaged while being, in theory, less risky. The distance to clear the tank was only 64 feet, less than half than his longest recorded jump, and the “man-eating killer sharks” also posed little threat. The shark wrangler in charge, told The New York Times prior to the event: “If he should fall in, he’d spook those animals right out of the pool.”

Yet, only hours before the live show, Evel made an unscheduled rehearsal leap in the empty arena. Clearing the pool, Knievel lost control upon landing. He skidded off the ramp’s side, inadvertently crashing through a retaining wall and into a cameraman. Evel and the cameraman were rushed to the hospital, marking the only time one of Knievels’s stunts had injured a bystander. Ever the showman, Evel claimed the cameraman’s eyeball was gouged out, though he was in fact only treated for minor injuries and soon released from care. Evel wasn’t as fortunate, fracturing his collarbone and right arm. 

Evel never returned to the daredevil scene, and The Shark Jump ultimately proved to be his final, high-profile, nationally broadcast performance. REC Watches received the original clutch levers from the XR750 used by Evel Knievel during the Shark Jump, which have been repurposed into the TTT Knievel timepieces.

  • EVEL KNIEVELS trademark signature has been printed on the inside of the caseback glass. The rotor is designed to mimic the spoked wheels of the XR750 stuntbike.
  • Use the crown to switch between
  • At center-stage, the star at the 12-o’clock dial marker is made from reforged aluminium from the clutch lever of Evel Knievels XR750 Shark Bike. Adding both visual and historical depth to each watch, the recycled material looks unique in every single TTT KNIEVEL timepiece.
  • Protruding from the outer case, the wire lugs are inspired by the bike’s exhaust pipes and integrated in the outer case frame, providing a striking contrast of metal finishings between the vertically brushed case and polished lugs
  • The openworked dial and exhibition caseback allows a full display of the skeletonized SW200-1Sb movement.
  • EVEL KNIEVELS trademark signature has been printed on the inside of the caseback glass. The rotor is designed to mimic the spoked wheels of the XR750 stuntbike.
  • Use the crown to switch between
  • At center-stage, the star at the 12-o’clock dial marker is made from reforged aluminium from the clutch lever of Evel Knievels XR750 Shark Bike. Adding both visual and historical depth to each watch, the recycled material looks unique in every single TTT KNIEVEL timepiece.
  • Protruding from the outer case, the wire lugs are inspired by the bike’s exhaust pipes and integrated in the outer case frame, providing a striking contrast of metal finishings between the vertically brushed case and polished lugs
  • The openworked dial and exhibition caseback allows a full display of the skeletonized SW200-1Sb movement.
  • EVEL KNIEVELS trademark signature has been printed on the inside of the caseback glass. The rotor is designed to mimic the spoked wheels of the XR750 stuntbike.
    EVEL KNIEVELS trademark signature has been printed on the inside of the caseback glass. The rotor is designed to mimic the spoked wheels of the XR750 stuntbike.
  • Use the crown to switch between
    Use the crown to switch between “DRESS” and “RIDE” modes in which the entire dial is rotated 30 degrees clockwise through a dual case case construction.
  • At center-stage, the star at the 12-o’clock dial marker is made from reforged aluminium from the clutch lever of Evel Knievels XR750 Shark Bike. Adding both visual and historical depth to each watch, the recycled material looks unique in every single TTT KNIEVEL timepiece.
    At center-stage, the star at the 12-o’clock dial marker is made from reforged aluminium from the clutch lever of Evel Knievels XR750 Shark Bike. Adding both visual and historical depth to each watch, the recycled material looks unique in every single TTT KNIEVEL timepiece.
  • Protruding from the outer case, the wire lugs are inspired by the bike’s exhaust pipes and integrated in the outer case frame, providing a striking contrast of metal finishings between the vertically brushed case and polished lugs
    Protruding from the outer case, the wire lugs are inspired by the bike’s exhaust pipes and integrated in the outer case frame, providing a striking contrast of metal finishings between the vertically brushed case and polished lugs
  • The openworked dial and exhibition caseback allows a full display of the skeletonized SW200-1Sb movement.
    The openworked dial and exhibition caseback allows a full display of the skeletonized SW200-1Sb movement.
The Design Challenge

LITTLE RISK, LITTLE REWARD

Our mission was to design a timepiece capturing the extraordinary life and showmanship of Evel Knievel and his heart-stopping stunts. Below is a brief summary of how the TTT Knievel timepieces were developed.

At center-stage, the star at the 12-o’clock dial marker is made from reforged aluminium from the handlebar levers of Evel Knievels XR750 Shark Bike. Adding both visual and historical depth to each watch, the recycled material looks unique in every single TTT Knievel timepiece.

As a result of the natural limitations of repurposing the original materials of the XR750 Shark Bike, the TTT Knievel timepieces are limited to a grand total of just 736 pieces, and will not be reproduced.

The openworked dial and exhibition caseback allows a full display of the skeletonized SW200-1Sb movement, complete with black ruthenium plating and a rotor inspired by the spoked motorcycle wheels. On the inside of the caseback crystal, Evel Knievels trademark signature is printed in blue.

Extending from the outer case, the wire lugs are inspired by the bike’s exhaust pipes and integrated in the outer case frame, providing a striking contrast of metal finishings between the vertically brushed case and polished lugs. On the left side of the outer case, a small placque is positioned containing the serial number.

Design references to Evel Knievels signature red, white and blue star-spangled attire are integrated across the design as a whole, including embossed stripes on the inner lining of the double-calf leather strap. 

Dual Case Construction

THE HIDDEN STAR

The TTT Knievel timepiece features an in-house developed dual case construction, allowing the user to switch between RIDE and DRESS wearing mode using the crown or bezel.

In Ride mode, the dial is shifted a full 30-degrees clockwise, centring the 12 o’clock view position when gripping the handlebars of a motorcycle.

In reference to his showmanship, concealed engravings on the inner case system are visible in the cut-out area adjacent to where the crown meets case, with the RIDE position showing a shooting star and the DRESS position reading “SHOW TIME”.

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